Individuals are rarely memorialised, whether by the naming of buildings or institutions or by the erection of statues, on the basis of a holistic view of their moral worth. Memorials are created on the basis of people as symbols of something which has meaning to those doing the naming and with which they wish to be associated.

A problem then arises if that name is subsequently branded as a symbol of something else.

Russell-Cooke Senior Partner John Gould reflects in New Law Journal on historical ideals falling out of step with modern times via the example of Gatehouse Chambers, formerly known as Hardwicke Chambers.

Rebranding the past is available to read on the New Law Journal via subscription.

John is Senior Partner of Russell-Cooke. His area of particular expertise is regulation and public law. He specialises in the analysis and solution of complex regulatory problems, advising regulators, government departments, law enforcement agencies, charities and statutory and professional bodies.