In simpler times, parties to litigation were either litigants in person (LiP) or represented by a lawyer authorised to conduct litigation.

However, innovations in technology, increasing competition from unregulated
providers and the withdrawal of legal aid have changed the landscape, and the line between regulated and unregulated activities has become increasingly blurred.

Michael Stacey explains in Solicitors Journal that there is still significant uncertainty as to which side of the line particular activities fall and the extent to which the requirement for regulation can be avoided by presenting activities as advice and assistance to an LiP. 

Regulating litigation in the 21st century is free to read via pdf.

Michael is a partner in the litigation team.

His particular specialism is regulatory and public law.

Michael acts for regulators, businesses, charities, other institutions and private clients in regulatory investigations, complex disciplinary proceedings (including statutory appeals), judicial reviews, professional liability disputes and other regulatory litigation.