Where an owner or occupier of land does something on their land that causes an unreasonable interference with someone else's enjoyment of their land, they may have committed the tort of nuisance.

In the case of drying laundry, it would take an extraordinary situation to amount to a nuisance — industrial levels of drying perhaps - if it takes place within the legal property boundaries.

If that washing were to cross the legal boundary, however, court action may be required.

Russell-Cooke partner Ed Cracknell answers a reader's question in The Sunday Times' Home Help section. 

My neighbour's washing keeps blowing into my garden. What can I do? is available to read on the Times website via subscription. 

Ed is a partner in the property and housing litigation team.

He specialises in all aspects of property litigation and property dispute resolution. His areas of expertise include landlord and tenant disputes, business lease renewals, rent and service charge recovery, possession proceedings, and dilapidations claims.